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Androvett Blog

by Robert Tharp at 1:30:33 pm

Microsoft fails to quash $200 million patent-infringement verdict

As reported by the Seattle Times and many others today, not only has Microsoft Corp. failed to quash a $200 million patent-infringement verdict, but the award has since grown to $290 million and counting with enhanced damages. U.S. District Judge Leonard Davis also issued a permanent injunction banning Microsoft from selling Microsoft Word products that include the customized XML feature at the center of the dispute with Toronto-based technology provider and document management company i4i Inc.

The i4i verdict is just the latest in a stellar string of courtroom victories for McKool Smith. The i4i verdict is the seventh-largest jury verdict this year, and the third-largest patent verdict, according to Bloomberg data.

During the trial, attorneys from McKool Smith and Tyler, Texas-based Parker, Bunt & Ainsworth successfully argued that Microsoft infringed the i4i patent issued in 1998, U.S. Patent No. 5,787,499, which covers software designed to manipulate "document architecture and content." The software covered by the patent removed the need for individual, manually embedded command codes to control text formatting in electronic documents.

Judge Davis ruled that Microsoft should pay i4i an additional $40 million for its willful infringement of the i4i patent. Microsoft also was ordered to pay slightly more than $37 million in prejudgment interest, including an additional $21,102 per day until a final judgment is reached in the case. The court also ordered Microsoft to pay $144,060 per day until the date of final judgment for post-verdict damages. Today's permanent injunction prohibits Microsoft from selling or importing to the United States any Microsoft Word products that have the capability of opening .XML, .DOCX or DOCM files (XML files) containing custom XML. The court is requiring Microsoft to comply with the injunction within 60 days.