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Androvett Blog

by Dave Moore at 12:00:00 am

He said/she said legal cases are among the hardest for jurors and judges.

When a verdict is handed down, there can be nagging doubt: Is the wrong person being punished in this case? With the increasing use of portable audio and video technology, such doubts are evaporating in disputes involving traffic stops. A good recent example of how audio and visual evidence can change the legal dynamic is the dashcam video taken from a March 13, 2013, traffic stop in Electra, Texas (2010 population 2,791).

The video – which has logged more than 200,000 views on YouTube – has become a symbol of abuse of power in small-town police departments to many.

"The police officers in the video used coarse language and ordered the person they were investigating to be silent, and they refused to answer his questions,” says Dallas criminal defense attorney John R. Teakell, who has more than 25 years of trial experience. “The prosecutor had to consider how that behavior looked and the case likely was dropped for that reason. In the Electra traffic stop, the dashcam became an equalizer. 

The case wasn't going to be about the word of two police officers versus the man they were questioning. It was about what the camera captured."

As audio and video surveillance becomes more prevalent in American society, it’s likely the amount of such evidence will continue to grow for courts.

by Robert Tharp at 4:10:00 pm

KTRK-TV in Houston recently piggybacked on the popularity of ABC’s hit show “Scandal” by seeking out a real-life local example of the show’s brilliant fixer, Olivia Pope. They found her in Androvett Legal Media’s own Mary Flood.

In a segment that aired on the opening night of the show’s new season, KTRK’s Melanie Lawson spoke with Mary about the show (she’s a big fan), the challenges of crisis-related public relations, and how her real-world professional life differs from what viewers see on “Scandal.”

While Mary hasn’t had to deal with any PR-crises involving dead bodies (yet), she routinely helps clients navigate the media gauntlet. The stakes can be high, often involving professional reputations or critical business conflicts and criminal or ethical questions. Discretion is at a premium here, so anyone wanting juicy stories will have to stick to “Scandal.”

Those who find themselves in a jam listen to Mary because she has the professional bona fides – she’s a Harvard-trained lawyer and a former nationally respected news reporter – but also because she doesn’t put any shellac on her advice. 

“We find out what the true story is, and we remind them that you never, ever, ever lie,” she tells KTRK.

A full list of our crisis-communications advice can be found here.

by Robert Tharp at 3:30:00 pm

http://www.androvett.com/clientuploads/_photos/Blog_Photos/cnbc.pngBusiness analysts are expecting a jump in the number of H-1B visa applications filed this year by U.S. companies trying to fill coveted science, technology and engineering jobs. As many as 160,000 or more foreign-worker visa applications are expected when the H-1B visa filing season begins April 1. While job offers are plentiful, the H-1B applicants will be vying for 85,000 available visas this year. Businesses must seek the visas because U.S. universities are simply not turning out enough U.S. students with these specialized skills.

“It just shows the U.S. still lags behind other countries when it comes to an emphasis on educating American-born students in computer science, math and other areas," said Dallas immigration attorney Marc Klein of Thompson & Knight in an interview with CNBC.

"So many get advanced degrees at American universities that natural-born citizens don't receive, and (which) are needed for the hard-to-fill jobs," he said. "They go home, and yet so many of them make up the number of applications to work here."

Writes CNBC: It's not just the areas of technology and science that are seeing a need for foreign-born workers in the U.S., Klein added. He said he's processing applications for jobs in accounting, advertising and architecture.

H-1B visas have been part of immigration reform talks that have stalled in Congress, with many on Capitol Hill and the business community— especially those in high-tech industries—urging the government to raise the 85,000 limit or remove it completely. With reform stalled in Congress, the quota will remain for now.

Some U.S. business leaders say they have no problem finding American-born workers for the high-tech jobs that often go to foreign nationals. However, Klein said the economics indicate otherwise.

"It's not cheap to try and get H-1B visas," he said. "Companies don't really want the expense if they can avoid it. But they're having trouble avoiding it."