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Androvett Blog

by Dave Moore at 3:30:00 pm

Far too often, the practice of law focuses on fixing blame and seeking cash awards, rather than solving problems. In a column recently published by Texas Lawyer, Bill Chamblee discusses how Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas – which treated the first U.S. Ebola patient, Thomas Eric Duncan – became the proving ground for how to take ownership of medical mishaps.

Chamblee, managing partner of Chamblee, Ryan, Kershaw & Anderson, P.C., writes (paywalled link here):

Amidst all the panic, hysteria and moral indignation, leaders at Presbyterian Dallas did something unexpected by personally apologizing to Duncan's fiancée, Louise Troh, and taking responsibility for what happened.

"This official said the hospital was 'deeply sorry' for the way this tragedy played out," Troh said in the statement released to the media. "I am grateful to the hospital for this personal call. I am grateful to God that this leader reached out and took responsibility for the hospital's actions. Hearing this information will help me as I mourn Eric's death."

Suddenly, the discussion no longer focused on how Presbyterian Dallas wronged a West African carrier of Ebola and threatened the public health. The hospital's apology shifted the conversation to the importance of caring for people such as Mr. Duncan who have contracted the Ebola virus. Most would agree that it was inevitable that Ebola would appear somewhere in our country, but the important question was how our health care providers and government officials would respond.

Chamblee, who has defended health care providers for 29 years, adds that medical professionals frequently overlook the fact that a kind word, a thoughtful gesture and an open ear can prevent lawsuits from patients who are unhappy about a medical outcome.