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Androvett Blog

by Amy Hunt at 11:04:00 am

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If you’re a divorced parent receiving child support payments, you might be getting a little more money now than you did a few months ago. That’s thanks to the Texas Legislature updating the Texas Family Code with changes that took effect Sept. 1.

"This could mean an extra $210 a month for one child, which is a lot to parents struggling to make ends meet,” says Brad LaMorgese, a partner in the Dallas Family Law boutique McCurley Orsinger McCurley Nelson & Downing, L.L.P. "Of course, there are possible exceptions to the child support guidelines, so be sure to talk to your attorney if your needs exceed those envisioned by the Family Code.”

There has long been a cap on the amount of income the parent paying child support must pay. Before Sept. 1, the cap was $7,500 a month. Using the standard percentage formula under child support guidelines, that meant the most a parent would pay in support for one child would be 20 percent of $7,500, or $1,500 a month. The updated cap is now $8,550, meaning a parent paying child support for one child could now pay up to $1,710, 20 percent of $8,550.

Under the guidelines, 5 percent is added for each child with a maximum of up to 40 percent for five or more children. (It’s important to note that adjustments can be made if the non-custodial parent has children from other marriages or relationships.)

by Amy Hunt at 10:30:00 am

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A May 2013 ruling by the Texas Supreme Court temporarily put a chill up the collective spine of the Texas Family Law bar when the court declared in Tedder v. Aldrich that attorney fees and expenses in a divorce case shouldn’t be considered part of one spouse’s statutory requirement to support the other while the divorce is pending.

Traditionally, Texas courts have considered such expenses to be “necessaries” and often ordered one of the parties to pay them. The Tedder ruling, however, meant that those fees would no longer fall under the heading of “necessaries.” That opened up the possibility that they could end up being the responsibility of the lesser-earning spouse, who may not have the money to pay them.

Fortunately, the Texas Legislature was in session when the high court handed down its ruling and amended the Family Code to say that such expenses may be included as “necessaries,” thus restoring balance to the universe. Kind of.

"We're glad the Legislature and Gov. Perry addressed the availability of legal fees in divorce, but the courts still have a lot of discretion to order – or not order – legal fees to be paid," says Brad LaMorgese, a partner in the Dallas Family Law boutique McCurley Orsinger McCurley Nelson & Downing, L.L.P. "Unless a premarital agreement says otherwise, legal fees should be considered 'necessary.'"

by Dave Moore at 12:00:00 am

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Big Tex – the symbol of the State Fair of Texas – was publically unveiled Thursday, a day earlier than planned. Intense winds actually caused the premature premiere, according to media accounts. 

As CNN reported:

Big Tex 2.0 was scheduled to be unveiled on opening day of the State Fair. But due to high winds, and the size of the tarp, covering him, as a precaution, State Fair officials unveiled him early. The new size of Big Tex is: 55ft high, and weighs 25,000 pounds. Big Tex has had a facelift and looks 25 years younger and more cartoonish.

Dallas real estate attorney Marc Fanning says the early unveiling calls further attention to the vulnerability of – and need for properly insuring – all possessions, even reborn 55-foot-tall cowboy statues.

“Like all property owners, the State Fair organization should insure their prized possessions in an appropriate amount to cover repair or replacement in the event of a catastrophe,” says Fanning, a director in the Dallas office of Fanning Harper Martinson Brandt & Kutchin, P.C. 

A little less than a year ago, Big Tex’s predecessor was engulfed in a fiery inferno caused by a mechanical failure. Fair organizers were reportedly reimbursed approximately $155,000 through insurance coverage toward the estimated replacement cost of $500,000 estimated replacement cost of the new Big Tex. Donations gladly poured in to make up the difference. “The campaign to generate donations to build the new Big Tex – who will make his debut this weekend – was brilliant, but fair leaders can't continue to rely on the kindness of strangers.”